Climate change, phenology match and the big unknown

This year was crazy in Seville with plants flowering 2-3 months earlier than last year. So we went to sample, and guess what: bees were there too. Despite expectations about phenological “mis-match” are raised here and there, we don’t find a big phenological mismatch between plants and pollinators*. I am not talking here of specific species, but taking a community approach. However, this is not the end of the story. Is good that plants and pollinators are in sync, but this alone doesn’t warrants a healthy ecosystem functioning.

Why not? My main worry is that after a mild January and beginning of February, we have now “normal cold days” again. Consequently, we also find little bee activity (today we are sampling at 14ºC just to make sure this is true). Hence, both plants and bees are likely to suffer. The demographic implications of this are hard to predict, maybe is not a big deal if it happens only one year, but if it happens often, I presume can be quite bad. All in all its hard to quantify, but I suspect that we need to go back to population dynamics if we want to understand climate change impacts beyond phenological overlaps.

*Don’t take this blog as word, there are plenty of good papers showing it (here and here), including my own (here and here), and very little showing a clear mismatch, most of those on specialized systems.

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Ecoflor 2016

Ecoflor is an annual Spanish meeting on everything related to flowers (from evolution to pollinators). The level is amazingly high for being a small “unorganized” local meeting and the most important part is that is a fun forum to discuss crazy ideas, and not just finished work. Here there are some of the things I learnt this year in no particular order:

  • You can do biogeography using Arabidobsis taliana. Moreover, flowering time can be regulated by photoperiod or vernalization and you can map responsible gens across regions (by X. Picò).
  • Plants can cooperate or be selfish depending on its genotype (by R. Torices).
  • The coolest talk was on epigenetics, which can redirect the course of evolution. With experimental data on radish exposed to herbivory. (by M. Sobral).
  • Invasive Oxalis pes-caprae was thought to have only one morph in its invasive rage and hance reproduce vegetatively only, but the second morph has arrived (and its here to stay) (by S. Castro)
  • Plant-pollinator networks can be better plotted than with bipartite (by J. Galeano)
  • And it was the first time one of my students talked in public. Definitively a great talk by Miguel Angel Collado on pollinator habitat preferences.

Next year will be in Seville, join us*!

*You need probably to know some spanish, but some talks are always in english an all slides are english.