Happy women and girls in science day!

Today we celebrate an important day. We celebrate equality in science! Hence, I want to make a post highlighting a few great researchers I have the privilege to work with. I was lucky enough to interact with lots of great female scientists and my stereotype of a scientist’s is not an old white man. I know this is not common, and this is why it’s important to show that there are plenty of awesome female researchers like the ones I met, specially to ensure young girls have a diversity of role models.

So here there are four great researchers in different career stages. First, my PhD Advisor, Montse Vilà. She investigates the impacts of invasive plants and was my first contact with a real scientist. Second, my PostDoc advisor, Rachael Winfree, from whom I learnt a million things. She investigates how bee diversity determines ecosystem functioning. Third, Romina Rader, who studies non bee pollinators. We met as postdocs and has become one of my usual collaborators. Finally, Ainhoa Magrach, which I hired as Postdoc last year and it was super-stimulating to work with. She is now studying the impact of global change on biodiversity. I could name many more because almost half of my coauthors are great female scientists, but I’ll stop here. Today several initiatives are highlighting the awesome work that women do in ecology, for example here (spanish) or here, so check it out and spread the word, specially among young girls and schools!

 

Bugs, kids and swimming pools

I accidentally found a great way to make kids into natural history/entomology during summer holidays.
All you need is a catch-net, Chinery’s Insect of European insects book (or any other general insect book for your region) and a swimming pool.
Kids catch drowned insects in the pool with the net (quite frequent drownings in our case*, I have to say, and I wonder how high are the death rates caused by swimming pools globally!). Collecting that way is already quite fun. Most bugs are still alive and we let them dry gently. It’s quite rewarding to see them fly away after a couple of minutes, which is wonderful because kids are now bug-rescuers, not bug-killers! Additionally, wet bugs are slow and let you see them and try to id them (i.e. at least to family or genus). So this is a kill free, easy way to see bugs
If you want the scientific bonus, we also recorded the frequency of each species, time of the day and if it was dead of alive. You can then explore the data. We found 52 specimens of 22 morphospecies. Of the several insect groups recorded (wasps, bees, ants, flies, beetles, moths, harvestmen (opiliones), heteropterans, milipids, …), the most numerous were wasps. Interestingly, among the two most common species, Polistes has higher mortality rates (4 out of 8 ;50%) than Vespula (3 out of 9; 33%). The coolest insect was probably the stick bug!
*If not much insects fall in the pool, open the filter and you should find dozens of mostly dead bodies.

P-hacking and Paul Feyerabend

P-hacking, or researcher degrees of freedom, it’s a worrying issue in science. Specially, because p-hacking is not a black and white issue. On the blackest side there is deliberate p-hacking with the only purpose to advance your career. This is bad, but I hope it’s rare*. The grey area is more intriguing, because it concerns researchers not doing it consciously. I used to think that this include researchers that never had a proper statistical training, with too much pressure to publish too small datasets or that fool themselves thinking that this new analysis/subset of the data is what he/she should be testing in first place, so it doesn’t matter really the 200 previous analysis/subsets (which is false, they matter!). This is equally bad for science (even if the motivation is not as bad).

But then I read “against method” of Paul Feyerabend**. Despite some passages are really slow and repetitive, I liked it. A big part of the book explains Galileo Gallilei story. Galileo changed the paradigm based in incomplete theory, iffy data and measurement tools, and lots of propaganda. He used more its intuition than a proper scientific method. He was still right and most of his ideas were confirmed years later.

And that rang a bell. I’ve heard before scientists saying things like “well, we can’t measure it accurately, but trust me I know the system and this is what is happening”. From here to do a bit of conscious or unconscious p-hacking to support your hypothesis there is a small step. This researchers are using intuition, hours of thought and lots of knowledge. This scientists are putting forward their ideas. Ideas in which they believe, but they can’t just prove unequivocally with the data at hand because of the complexity of the problem.

Paul Feyerabend said that “everything goes” if it advances science. I am not justifying p-hacking to support something that it’s hard to  prove but you think is true, but after reading Feyerabend I am also less worried about adding some subjectivity to the scientific method, because being completely objective and following the method strictly may also slow down science. Maybe the middle ground is being able to recognizing when something is an opinion, and not facts, and avoid sticking a p-value to this opinion, but defend it anyway in the light of the data available and try to push forward the agenda to get better data, better methods, or whatever you need to support it. It’s complicated.


*people that only want to advance their careers choosed politics in first place, not science, right?  I know this is probably a wrong assumption.

**In a nutshell he praises that an objective scientific method is unattainable and rarely applied, and that we should free ourselves from using it as the single tool to do science. I liked for example the idea of aiming to create a plethora of theories (with no historical constraints or resistance from the status quo to accept compatible alternative explanations) that can cohabit and let time to do the thinning a posteriori. More on wikipedia.

Preferring a preference index II: null models

This is a guest post by my PhD student Miguel Ángel Collado. My last post on preferring a preference indexes was not satisfactory to us, so we have better options now. Read Miguel Ángel solution below.


We are working on the ecological value of various habitats or sites. In addition to different classical biodiversity indexes, we want to know if we have some sites that are not specially diverse, but they have some ecologically important species attached to them, we could measure this through preference analyses, using null models to compare with our data.

We can define “preference” for an species if the presence of this species on a given site is bigger than expected by random. A way to know this is comparing to null models and establishing an upper threshold for preference, and a lower one for avoidance, this way we would know whether some species of interest have affinity for some sites or just use them as expected.

To see an example of this

Food consumption and global change

A conversation today at lunch time made me think about some notes I took on this topic, which I reproduce here:

Jonathan Foley gave a pretty convincing talk at ESA 2013 showing that meat consumption is unsustainable for the environment (i.e. land use + CO2 emissions). This was “the straw that broke the camel’s back”* for me and since then I reduced my meat consumption quite drastically.

However, I read a few days ago this paper showing that changing meat for vegetables and fruits can be even worse if you take also into account water footprint and energy use (e.g. transport and storage). I skip the details, but the bottom line is that the story is complicated and the best way to save the world is to reduce calorie intake and eat lots of grains. Here is Figure 2 from the paper (the paper style and figures are quite poor, by the way).

Tom_2015flexiterian_pdf__page_5_of_12_.png

It’s hard because even if you want to do the best is not easy. Is it better for the environment to use bacon or eggplant with my pasta? No idea!**. If I knew the Y axe of the following graph things would be easier.

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*this is what google suggest for translating “la gota que colma el vaso”.

**Is the bacon from pigs next door? Is the eggplant from Nicaragua?